Dec 26 2010

Used Car Buyers Guide

OK we’re looking at the Renault Megane (02-08).

Well there is pretty much a Megane to suit most people from 3 door Coupe to 4 and 5 door family cars, there is even an estate model.

Renault have over recent years suffered with many owners reporting niggling faults and poor part exchange values however new car sales have triumphed in the past year here in Ireland with a fresh product line up and great value for money offers.

Despite the problems there is great value to be had in well cared for used Meganes as many shy away due to poor reports about their reliability.

Firstly choose your used Megane wisely looking for a full service history or at least documented proof that the car has had a really complete service prior to the car being supplied to you by a dealer.

Secondly if you do take the plunge buy from a reputable dealer who provides you with a written clear guarantee.

The Megane isn’t all that well-built and typically can’t cope with neglect so making sure the car has been looked after is really important in choosing a used example. On petrol versions the ignition coil can fail so listen out for poor starting, uneven running or misfiring. If you’re looking at an early model 2002/2003 check the fuse box and make sure it’s not filled with water. Later examples are better sealed so less likely to leak. Headlight bulbs are difficult enough to replace so make sure they are working before you buy. Check all switches especially the electric windows several times as they regularly give trouble. Make sure you are being provided with two key cards for the car as they are very expensive. Also check both actually work.

If the car you are viewing has 17 inch alloys make sure the tyres are in good condition as the soft rubber coupled to the suspension set can lead to uneven wear.

The 1.4 petrol models are under powered our pick would be the 1.5dci as it drives so well and is fuel efficient however the petrol versions typically cost far less so your own circumstances may dictate which one is best suited.

The Air Con on the Megane can be troublesome so make sure it’s working and check if the system has had documented regeneration.

You may be put off by this review but really if you find a straight, well cared for Megane with a bullet proof service history at a good price you should be fine but make sure you get a detailed written guarantee. Typically the Megane makes far less than rivals such as the Focus or the Civic.


Dec 26 2010

Used Car Buyers Guide

Today we’re looking at the Volvo V70.

Volvo has always been famous for building estate cars particularly favoured by antique dealers and while our european cousins have always had a far greater desire to buy estate variants compared to us Irish the interest seems to be picking up here. This may be in no small way due to the reduction in SUV sales since 2008 yet the realisation of just how practical this SUV style body shape has i.e. a lifting hatch coupled to a long load bay.

So the Volvo V70, is it any good and what should you watch out for when looking at a used one.

Well in short yes it is good and there is little if anything Volvo don’t know about building excellent estate cars with the V70 able to trace its heritage all the way back to the fifties. Ok so our advise is stay clear of the petrol models as they’ll hit your pocket hard in terms of fuel consumption. The 2.4 litre diesel arrived in 2007 followed by a 2.0 diesel in November that year. A facelift in 2009 saw the arrival of a 1.6 diesel which is very acceptable in terms of power in most situations.

The V70 isn’t a real drivers car and German rivals such as the BMW 5 series and Audi A6 are far more accomplished to drive but you typically pay more for these cars too so it’s a matter of choice and taste.

Check the tyres as the V70 can wear them out quiet quickly so before you spend your money make sure you are not going to be shelling out again in a month for a set of new boots for your pride and joy.

Some V70 models have very low profile tyres and large alloys which look great but can really upset the ride quality and make the steering fidgety. So take the car for a good test drive in advance of buying over a few different road surfaces and see how you like the feed back through the steering wheel and the overall comfort.

While the electrics are generally pretty reliable we do recommend you check everything works and in particular the alarm as this is where most common faults occur.

The V70 has had 18 recalls in its life so far which is a lot but may not be something to get overly alarmed about however before you complete a purchase get the chassis number checked with a Volvo dealer to confirm all outstanding recalls have been completed on the model you are looking at buying.

So overall a really fine estate car that’s comfortable and relaxed to drive but that isn’t without its flaws and perhaps if you know this in advance you’ll enjoy ownership far more. Many first time Volvo owners have unrealistic expectations of this brand which ultimately disappoint.

Volvo V70

THE V70 IS WORTH A LOOK OVER MORE OBVIOUS GERMAN RIVALS.

2.5T, 3.0T and 3.2 Petrol

2.4 Diesel 2.0 Diesel 1.6 Diesel

Launched 2007-Todate.


Dec 26 2010

Used Car Buyers Guide

Today we’re looking at the Alfa Romeo Brera & Brera Spider.

Well if you’re looking for a family car then steer clear of the Brera as it has tiny rear seats and it’s 300 litre boot is simply not big enough for most people’s needs. The Brera is not to everyone’s taste but it certainly turns heads and forms opinions. Unlike Alfa’s of old that you could only buy with your heart the Brera has proven to be pretty reliable and well-built so not a bad second-hand buy if you’re in the market for this type of car.

If you are looking at one watch out for uneven front tyre wear which is common and you may need to get a four-wheel alignment carried out to show up any problems. If you’re buying from a dealer and the tyres all look good ask if the alignment has been done and look for a printout to confirm this and put your mind at ease. If the wear only shows up after you’ve bought you’ll have little or no grounds for help with replacing unevenly worn tyres.

Water pumps on diesel models also tend to fail and should typically be replaced every 60000 miles/100000km.

Also fairly common on the diesel version is intermittent brake problems such as a lack of braking assistance. A new master cylinder should cure this. If you haven’t got proof that this has been done prior to purchase look for it to be done or get a written guarantee covering it.

Check the alloy wheels carefully as kerbing is common and repairs can be costly. The Brera wouldn’t be an Alfa without a few electrical glitches and the Breras most common tend to be with the central locking, stereo and boot release so check all carefully in advance of purchasing.

Check the car all round for scrapes and bumps particularly at the rear as visibility is poor so rear bumper damage is common. A service history from an Alfa main dealer properly documented is desirable and a written guarantee a must.

Overall the Brera is a great car to drive and as they are not very common on Irish roads you’ll really turn heads for relatively small money. The diesel is the best version to go for in Ireland as resale value on other variants will frankly be shocking. Don’t buy the Brera thinking you’ve made a sound investment or it’s going to cost very little to run but do buy it if you’re a petrol head with a little disposable income to indulge your passion for driving beautiful italian sports cars.

Quick Glance

Alfa Romeo Brera

Engines 2.2 and 3.2V6 petrol and 2.4JTD Diesel

Service Yearly or 18000 miles up to 2008 and 21000 miles there after.

 


Dec 21 2010

A Bad Day At the Office

The Race of Champions saw Lotus F1 driver Heikki Kovalainen tangle with the scenery when he raced Seb Loeb in an Audi R8. Some collaborations don’t work I guess!


Dec 19 2010

A Guide To buying You're next Car

3D""1.Trade-In =
Appraisal

If you are part exchanging your current car or van expect a dealer to =
carry out a professional appraisal in order to give you the best and =
fairest price possible. A professional appraisal normally takes about 15 =
minutes. See our guide to maximizing your part exchanges value below. =
Remember you are selling your car to the dealer as well as buying a car =
from the dealer so get the most you can for it by following our simple =
guide.
2. New car test-drive
Make sure you take a test drive in the car you are interested in, all =
cars are not the same and neither are people so make sure the car is =
right for you. The dealer should be more than happy to facilitate a test =
drive and indeed recommend it. If you don=E2=80=99t feel comfortable =
driving a =E2=80=98different=E2=80=99 car then let the Sales person take =
you for a drive in it so you at least get a good idea of how it performs =
and how comfortable it is.
3. Cost to Change quote
Once you have completed the test drive and the dealer has completed the =
appraisal of your part exchange, should you have one, the dealer should =
sit down and give you a cost to change figure which is the difference =
between your current car and the one you wish to buy. Remember =
it=E2=80=99s the cost to change figure and exactly what that figure is =
buying that=E2=80=99s most important and critical in your determination =
of the value you are getting. One dealer may offer you more than another =
and this is normal for a variety of reasons.
4. Funding / Financing Arrangements
Once you are satisfied with this figure most dealers can provide you =
with the funding options that are available to you, from dealer finance =
typically backed by one of the main banks to cash purchase. If the =
dealer is arranging finance for you then a member of the dealership =
staff normally called a business manager will take a finance proposal =
which is totally confidential and which is processed by the finance =
provider who will make a decision on the application normally within a =
few hours.
5. Booking Deposit
Once everything is to your satisfaction and you are happy to proceed you =
may be asked for a securing deposit. This is quiet normal and allows the =
sales person to take the vehicle you have chosen off the market and so =
securing it for you. Typically this deposit is seen as a clear =
indication by you that you have agreed to purchase the car. A sales =
order which is a contract agreement between you and the dealer is then =
signed. A purchase order is also signed if you are part exchanging a =
vehicle as the dealer is purchasing your part exchange from you.
6. Collecting the Car you bought
On the big day of collection it can vary but most likely you will need =
to bring the following items with you;
o For your Trade-In
=EF=82=A7 Vehicle licensing certificate (If lost, Government charge of =
=E2=82=AC12.70 for a replacement)
=EF=82=A7 The dealer should complete a RF105 form with you that transfer =
responsibility for your old car to the dealer. Make sure this is done =
and you sign it.
=EF=82=A7 NCT certificate where applicable
=EF=82=A7 Service book and warranty documentation plus service =
receipts/invoices
=EF=82=A7 Owners manual
=EF=82=A7 Spare key (Alarm or master key if applicable)
=EF=82=A7 Radio code
=EF=82=A7 Insurance company contact details so the dealer can transfer =
your insurance
o To pay for your car
If you are funding with the dealer you need to bring along:
=EF=82=A7 Your current driving license or Passport a utility bill dated =
within the last three months with your name and address on it
=EF=82=A7 The dealer will make copies of these and should immediately =
return the originals to you
=EF=82=A7 If you have arranged a loan through a third party such as a =
Bank make sure you have a bank draft made payable to the dealership or =
that the funds have been transferred to the dealer otherwise handover of =
the vehicle may be delayed
=EF=82=A7 For your own security and that of dealership staff we advise =
cash transactions be kept to a minimum and only small amounts
7. Complete Transaction
Once all the paper work is complete (this normally takes about 20 =
minutes) expect the dealership staff to provide you with a full =
demonstration of the controls on the vehicle you have purchased and =
answer any questions you may have. You should also make a point of being =
introduced to the after sales management team so you can feel =
comfortable dealing with them at any future point. In the following days =
you should expect to be contacted to make sure everything is to your =
complete satisfaction.
How to Maximise my Cars Value
The first thing you should remember is that you=E2=80=99re not just part =
exchanging your car you are selling it and as such you need to present =
it in the best possible light to make sure its top value is achieved. If =
you think about how important presentation is in the car you intend to =
buy then you will see that how your current car looks is key to =
maximizing its value. The better your car is presented the less the =
dealer will expect to have to spend on it to get it ready for resale so =
the more the dealer will pay you for it. Take a day to visit the dealer =
or dealers of your choice. Prepare for this in advance by making sure =
your part exchange is clean inside and out. Get rid of any stuff you =
really don’t need to have in the car including mirror hangers, bumper =
stickers etc. Within reason present your car in a manner you would like =
to see the car you are buying. Remember you are asking the dealer to =
give you money for your car so don’t provide reasons for that figure to =
be lower than it should.
1. Full Service History
If you have a service history for your car or you have had major work =
carried out such as a timing belt changed don=E2=80=99t just tell the =
dealer bring along invoices, receipts etc that the dealer can show the =
next purchaser to prove the work is completed. Without a stamped service =
book and/or dealer invoices/receipts etc a car doesn=E2=80=99t have a =
service history that is of value to a dealer as he can=E2=80=99t show a =
perspective buyer evidence of the history. This documentation will =
greatly assist the appraisal process and give you the best chance of =
getting the most for your car.
2. Previous Owner History
Bring along the VLC (tax book) so that you can clearly show how many =
previous owners the car has had as many people when asked are unsure or =
give inaccurate information.
3. Spare Keys
Make sure you know if you have two keys for your part exchange. Keys can =
be very expensive so not having to buy one helps a dealer give you more.
4. NCT Certificate
If your car is due an NCT then get it done. If it passes you=E2=80=99ll =
get more for it and if it fails show the report to the dealer so an =
accurate appraisal can be carried out as the cost of preparing the car =
for resale will be easier to calculate. A car with an NCT due but not =
carried out leaves the dealer unsure of what hidden costs may have =
dissuaded you as the owner from having it done and prompted you to part =
exchange. So the dealer will be left with no choice but to err on the =
side of caution.
5. Car!
Remember you must present your car for appraisal to the dealer to get =
the maximum value. This may sound obvious but you=E2=80=99d be surprised =
how many people arrive at a dealership expecting a valuation on the car =
they want to part exchange without the actual car. Don=E2=80=99t expect =
the dealer to buy your car without seeing it. A professional appraisal =
should be very important to you as it shows the dealer puts a lot of =
care and attention into all the cars bought including the one you may be =
buying from him. Expecting a valuation over the telephone is not going =
to give your car the best chance of achieving its maximum value either. =
Would you buy a car without seeing it? I=E2=80=99m sure you =
wouldn=E2=80=99t. So don=E2=80=99t expect a dealer to either. If =
you=E2=80=99re really interested in getting top money for it prepare =
your car in advance and bring it to the dealership for appraisal.

In relation to the car you want to buy if it’s used
Always insist on getting a Car History Check on the car you are buying.
Always insist on an SIMI approved printed car history check. A =
registered SIMI reputable dealer will have no problem in giving you one =
for the used car you want to buy and make sure it covers everything from =
HPi to UK history if applicable. If the dealer won=E2=80=99t provide you =
with this check walk away.
A Car history check should give the following information:
=E2=80=A2 Any outstanding finance
=E2=80=A2 If the car is an import
=E2=80=A2 If the car is a insurance write off in the UK or Ireland
=E2=80=A2 Previous mileage records
=E2=80=A2 If the car was used as a Hackney or Taxi.
Every used car is unique and all have been treated differently so make =
sure you are comparing like with like. You shouldn=E2=80=99t just buy a =
used car based on price. Like insurance, back up service is only =
appreciated when it=E2=80=99s needed.


Dec 19 2010

A Guide To buying You’re next Car

1.Trade-In Appraisal
If you are part exchanging your current car or van expect a dealer to carry out a professional appraisal in order to give you the best and fairest price possible. A professional appraisal normally takes about 15 minutes. See our guide to maximizing your part exchanges value below. Remember you are selling your car to the dealer as well as buying a car from the dealer so get the most you can for it by following our simple guide.
2. New car test-drive
Make sure you take a test drive in the car you are interested in, all cars are not the same and neither are people so make sure the car is right for you. The dealer should be more than happy to facilitate a test drive and indeed recommend it. If you don’t feel comfortable driving a ‘different’ car then let the Sales person take you for a drive in it so you at least get a good idea of how it performs and how comfortable it is.
3. Cost to Change quote
Once you have completed the test drive and the dealer has completed the appraisal of your part exchange, should you have one, the dealer should sit down and give you a cost to change figure which is the difference between your current car and the one you wish to buy. Remember it’s the cost to change figure and exactly what that figure is buying that’s most important and critical in your determination of the value you are getting. One dealer may offer you more than another and this is normal for a variety of reasons.
4. Funding / Financing Arrangements
Once you are satisfied with this figure most dealers can provide you with the funding options that are available to you, from dealer finance typically backed by one of the main banks to cash purchase. If the dealer is arranging finance for you then a member of the dealership staff normally called a business manager will take a finance proposal which is totally confidential and which is processed by the finance provider who will make a decision on the application normally within a few hours.
5. Booking Deposit
Once everything is to your satisfaction and you are happy to proceed you may be asked for a securing deposit. This is quiet normal and allows the sales person to take the vehicle you have chosen off the market and so securing it for you. Typically this deposit is seen as a clear indication by you that you have agreed to purchase the car. A sales order which is a contract agreement between you and the dealer is then signed. A purchase order is also signed if you are part exchanging a vehicle as the dealer is purchasing your part exchange from you.
6. Collecting the Car you bought
On the big day of collection it can vary but most likely you will need to bring the following items with you;
o For your Trade-In
 Vehicle licensing certificate (If lost, Government charge of €12.70 for a replacement)
 The dealer should complete a RF105 form with you that transfer responsibility for your old car to the dealer. Make sure this is done and you sign it.
 NCT certificate where applicable
 Service book and warranty documentation plus service receipts/invoices
 Owners manual
 Spare key (Alarm or master key if applicable)
 Radio code
 Insurance company contact details so the dealer can transfer your insurance
o To pay for your car
If you are funding with the dealer you need to bring along:
 Your current driving license or Passport a utility bill dated within the last three months with your name and address on it
 The dealer will make copies of these and should immediately return the originals to you
 If you have arranged a loan through a third party such as a Bank make sure you have a bank draft made payable to the dealership or that the funds have been transferred to the dealer otherwise handover of the vehicle may be delayed
 For your own security and that of dealership staff we advise cash transactions be kept to a minimum and only small amounts
7. Complete Transaction
Once all the paper work is complete (this normally takes about 20 minutes) expect the dealership staff to provide you with a full demonstration of the controls on the vehicle you have purchased and answer any questions you may have. You should also make a point of being introduced to the after sales management team so you can feel comfortable dealing with them at any future point. In the following days you should expect to be contacted to make sure everything is to your complete satisfaction.
How to Maximise my Cars Value
The first thing you should remember is that you’re not just part exchanging your car you are selling it and as such you need to present it in the best possible light to make sure its top value is achieved. If you think about how important presentation is in the car you intend to buy then you will see that how your current car looks is key to maximizing its value. The better your car is presented the less the dealer will expect to have to spend on it to get it ready for resale so the more the dealer will pay you for it. Take a day to visit the dealer or dealers of your choice. Prepare for this in advance by making sure your part exchange is clean inside and out. Get rid of any stuff you really don’t need to have in the car including mirror hangers, bumper stickers etc. Within reason present your car in a manner you would like to see the car you are buying. Remember you are asking the dealer to give you money for your car so don’t provide reasons for that figure to be lower than it should.
1. Full Service History
If you have a service history for your car or you have had major work carried out such as a timing belt changed don’t just tell the dealer bring along invoices, receipts etc that the dealer can show the next purchaser to prove the work is completed. Without a stamped service book and/or dealer invoices/receipts etc a car doesn’t have a service history that is of value to a dealer as he can’t show a perspective buyer evidence of the history. This documentation will greatly assist the appraisal process and give you the best chance of getting the most for your car.
2. Previous Owner History
Bring along the VLC (tax book) so that you can clearly show how many previous owners the car has had as many people when asked are unsure or give inaccurate information.
3. Spare Keys
Make sure you know if you have two keys for your part exchange. Keys can be very expensive so not having to buy one helps a dealer give you more.
4. NCT Certificate
If your car is due an NCT then get it done. If it passes you’ll get more for it and if it fails show the report to the dealer so an accurate appraisal can be carried out as the cost of preparing the car for resale will be easier to calculate. A car with an NCT due but not carried out leaves the dealer unsure of what hidden costs may have dissuaded you as the owner from having it done and prompted you to part exchange. So the dealer will be left with no choice but to err on the side of caution.
5. Car!
Remember you must present your car for appraisal to the dealer to get the maximum value. This may sound obvious but you’d be surprised how many people arrive at a dealership expecting a valuation on the car they want to part exchange without the actual car. Don’t expect the dealer to buy your car without seeing it. A professional appraisal should be very important to you as it shows the dealer puts a lot of care and attention into all the cars bought including the one you may be buying from him. Expecting a valuation over the telephone is not going to give your car the best chance of achieving its maximum value either. Would you buy a car without seeing it? I’m sure you wouldn’t. So don’t expect a dealer to either. If you’re really interested in getting top money for it prepare your car in advance and bring it to the dealership for appraisal.

In relation to the car you want to buy if it’s used
Always insist on getting a Car History Check on the car you are buying.
Always insist on an SIMI approved printed car history check. A registered SIMI reputable dealer will have no problem in giving you one for the used car you want to buy and make sure it covers everything from HPi to UK history if applicable. If the dealer won’t provide you with this check walk away.
A Car history check should give the following information:
• Any outstanding finance
• If the car is an import
• If the car is a insurance write off in the UK or Ireland
• Previous mileage records
• If the car was used as a Hackney or Taxi.
Every used car is unique and all have been treated differently so make sure you are comparing like with like. You shouldn’t just buy a used car based on price. Like insurance, back up service is only appreciated when it’s needed.


Dec 18 2010

Driving Tips in Snow

Well the best advice is don’t drive in snow if you can avoid it but of course when the snow stays around for two weeks as it did this December that’s not really an option. So taking it as a given that you’re going to be driving this winter in snow I’ll borrow a motto from the scouts, yes that’s it ‘Be prepared’.

So here we go 10 Top Tips to get you and your car where you want to go.
1. If you haven’t actually prepared your car for winter by having it serviced and getting wipers and tyres checked and changed as required then you should really consider it now.
2. Ok so the snow has arrived and you have to go out on a bitterly cold morning and get ready for the journey ahead. Firstly clear all the snow off the vehicle not just the windscreen. Snow left on the roof can slide forward as your driving greatly reducing visibility. A large amount of snow sliding from the roof on to the windscreen will be too heavy for the wipers to lift and could result in a complete black out. Also remember to clear all snow stuck to front and rear lights so that you can not only see but be seen.
3. Check all fluid levels before setting out including oil, coolant and washer bottle levels. Don’t forget fuel level not just for the journey you plan but also if you get stuck in a heavy traffic jam as has happened many motor way users. If this happens to you you’ll need to be able to keep the car running in order for the heaters to work and if you don’t have enough fuel it could mean you’re in for a cold night stuck in the car. 
4. Once this is done start the car and switch on the heated rear screen and set the air direction to the windscreen. By the time you are ready to travel the car will be much more comfortable for you.
5. Have a safety pack on board which should include food & water, additional clothes or blankets for when you get stranded. A warning triangle, high viz vests for all occupants, ice scrape/de-icer, tow rope and a spade.
6. Ok so your about to set out, if you have a pair of sun glasses it’s worth having them in the car not to look cool but to defend your eyes as the glare from the sun on snow can be very difficult to deal with on a long journey.

7. Check your tyres for thread depth and pressure. If your tyres are below the legal limit don’t travel as you will have little or no grip. Tyre pressures should be as the manufacturers specifications and typically at the lower end increasing the amount of tyre in contact with the surface you are traveling over. If you can invest in a mini tyre compressor to add to your safety pack.
8. So your on the move and it should be remembered that the greatest traction you will get is in a straight line so sudden changes in direction, speed or braking are to be avoided. Get into the highest gear suitable for the conditions this reduces torque meaning less chance of wheel spin. If you are descending a hill you should be in the lowest gear possible. Think ahead, if you are approaching a junction for example use the gears to slow the car so that by the time you reach the junction it takes little or no braking to stop.
9. Keep a really large distance between you and other road users so that if things do go wrong you have as much time as possible to react. We’ve all had the tailgater that seems intent on parking in our boot and in these conditions that is really dangerous so if you find yourself being followed by one of these try to pull in as soon as it is safe to do so and let them continue by on their way to the scene of their inevitable accident.

10. Give yourself lots of time! Distraction, lack of concentration and speed are sure to increase your chances of not making it to your destination safely. Make sure your mobile phone is charged and you have a phone car charger with you also.

So enjoy the snow and be safe!


Dec 18 2010

Stunning New Alfa due in 2011

 

The stunning looking Alfa Giulia is due in 2011 and will replace the 159 which while not a bad car never achieved the success of the 156 ironically due in no small way on these shores to the 156 reliability issues and mega depreciation.
Anyway this new offering from Alfa is beautiful but we’ll have to wait and see just how reliable it proves to be and how well-built.
The range topping 300 BHP Cloverleaf with its road hugging body kit and 19 inch alloys  makes a big impression to say the least.
The diesel versions will sell best in Ireland and these range in power from  104 BHP to 200 BHP  .
This year 2010 of course marked Alfa’s 100th Birthday. Born on the 24th of June 1910 when a group of local entrepreneurs took over the Milanese auto maker Darracq.
Alfa as you may know stands for Anomina Lombarda Fabbrica Automobill….there’s one for a pub quiz!

Most petrol heads have owned an Alfa at some point or other and while their unreliability is well-known most owners can forgive almost anything given the way they look. Surely one of the most beautiful main stream production cars in the World Alfa Romeo delivers on style and passion if only they could screw the damn things together properly they would see main stream acceptance. Perhaps this in turn would destroy what we like about these cars. There’s nothing like the buzz of not knowing when next it won’t start or betting on which dash light will come on next! I guess it must be the same thing within us that makes us want to watch a horror movie, we know it’s going to be scary, we know we’ll have to hide behind the sofa and we’re not going to be able to sleep because of it but we still watch.

So I suppose we buy cars from the outside in. We fall in lust with the way an Alfa looks and by the time we realise it’s

not all we hoped it’s too late because we’ve been drawn in hook, line and Alfa.

Having had everything from 156′s, 147′s, 166′s and GTV’s I’m really looking forward to testing this new model when it arrives and comparing all the bits that fell off my previous models to see if they can be recycled!


Dec 15 2010

Welcome

Motorrevolution.com aims to bring you lots of up to date news, views and indeed reviews on all things motoring. In particular we’ll look at new car launches, comparison tests and even used cars. As we’re based in Ireland we’ll mainly focus on whats going to be of most interest to the Irish car scene. We’ll give tips and hints on everything from buying cars to maintaining them to driving them! We’ll also be happy to be guided by what interests you so just let us know what from the world of motoring you’d like to read about and we’ll see what we can do.

So thanks for visiting motorrevolution.com and why not subscribe and we’ll keep you up to date.

The Motorrevolution Team